Innogen · People · Innogen Associates
Dr Dagmara Weckowska

Lecturer In Business And Innovation

D.M.Weckowska@sussex.ac.uk

+44 1273 873521

University of Sussex
Jubilee Building JUB-205
Sussex House, Falmer
Brighton, BN1 9RH
United Kingdom

www.sussex.ac.uk/profiles/196061

Dagmara has joined the University of Sussex as a lecturer in Business and Innovation in 2014. Prior to taking the post Dagmara worked as a research fellow in Innogen - Institute for Innovation Generation in the Life Sciences at the University of Edinburgh. She holds a PhD in Technology and Innovation Management from SPRU-Science and Technology Policy Research at the University of Sussex (2013). During her doctoral study Dagmara worked as a teaching fellow in the Department of Business and Management (2011-13) and was involved in a range of research projects in SPRU for the European Commission, the Gatsby Charitable Foundation, and the UK Intellectual Property Office. Previous to that, Dagmara obtained a MSc in Applied Social Psychology from the University of Sussex and a Magister degree in Psychology (Organisational Psychology) from the University of Wroclaw, Poland.

Research Interests

Dagmara’s research explores individual, organisational, legislative and regulatory aspects that affect the emergence of science-based innovation. She is interested in why and how scientists share knowledge, particularly with non-academic innovators; how research commercialisation practices at universities, including intellectual property and knowledge management practices, evolve over time to stimulate innovation; and how legislative and regulatory frameworks affect knowledge creation and knowledge sharing between universities and industry.

Publications

Weckowska , D (2013) ‘The Effect of Management’s Strategic Practices on Situated Learning and Change in Organisational Practices: The Case of Commercialisation of Academic Research’ in Alegre, J., Chiva, R., Fernandez Mesa, A., Ferreras-Mendez, J. L., (Eds.), ‘'Shedding new lights on organisational learning, knowledge and capabilities’, Cambridge Scholars Publishing Ltd., Cambridge

Meyer, M., Grant, K., Morlacchi, P., Weckowska , D (2013) ‘Triple Helix indicators as an emergent area of enquiry - a bibliometric perspective’, Scientometrics DOI 10.1007/s11192-013-1103-8 

Weckowska , D (2013) ‘Situated learning in university Knowledge Transfer Offices: ‘science push’ and match-making approaches to commercialisation of academic research’, Triple Helix 11th International Conference, London, July 2013

Weckowska , D (2012) ‘Situated Learning and Change in Organisational Practices: Learning the Ropes of the Commercialization of Academic Research’, Conference for Organisational Learning, Knowledge and Capabilities, Valencia, Spain, April 2012

Weckowska , D (2010) ‘The role of intermediaries in the commercialisation of academic research: a practice-based approach’, DRUID-DIME Academy PhD Conference, Alborg, Denmark, January 2010

Tang, P., Weckowska , D, Campos, A., Hobday, M. (2009) ‘Managing Intellectual Property in Universities: Patents and the Protection Failure Problem’, report for Report prepared for the Gatsby Charitable Foundation

Lykogianni, E., Peeters, A., Verbeek, A., Børing, P., Kaloudis, A., Cox, D., Edler, J., Green, L., Flanagan, K., Jones, B., Morrison, K., Nugroho, Y., von Tuzelmann, N., Weckowska , D (2008) ‘Evidence on the main factors inhibiting mobility and career development of researchers’, report for European Commission: DG Research

Tang, P., Weckowska , D, Hobday, M. (2008) ‘Disentangling knowledge transfer: Maximising university revenue, or social and economic benefit, or both?’, report for Report prepared for the UK Intellectual Property Office

Weckowska , D, Tang, P. (2013) ‘Commercializing academic research: Disentangling selection capability of U.K. technology transfer offices’

Weckowska , D, Molas-Gallart, J., Tang, P., Twigg, D., Castro-Martinez, E., Kijeńska-Dąbrowska, I., Libaers, D., Meyer, M. (2013) ‘University Patenting and Technology Commercialization – Legal Frameworks and the Importance of Local Practice’