Innogen · People · Former Affiliated staff
Dr Martyn Pickersgill

Former Innogen Associate

martyn.pickersgill@ed.ac.uk

www.cphs.mvm.ed.ac.uk/people/staffProfile.php?profile=mpickers

Martyn came to Edinburgh in May 2009 to take up a post as Research Fellow and ESRC Co-Investigator in the College of Medicine and Veterinary Medicine at the University of Edinburgh. His current work, carried out with Professor Sarah Cunningham-Burley (PI; University of Edinburgh) and Dr Paul Martin (Co-I; University of Nottingham) forms part of a research grant entitled ‘Constituting Neurologic Subjects: Neuroscience, Identity and Society after the ‘Decade of the Brain’’. Broadly, this empirical project concerns the ethical, political and social dimensions of neuroscience.

Prior to his appointment at the University of Edinburgh, Martyn was based at the University of Nottingham. He has been an ESRC-sponsored Visiting Scholar on the Science, Technology and Society Program at the John F. Kennedy School of Government, Harvard University, and John J. Pisano Grantee and Guest Researcher at the Office of NIH History, National Institutes of Health (USA). Martyn is also an Associate Fellow of the Institute of Mental Health (a collaborative venture between the University of Nottingham and Nottinghamshire Healthcare NHS Trust) and part of think-tank on Law, Policy and Ethics, established under the aegis of the Personality Disorder Institute.

Research Interests

To date, Martyn’s research has focussed on the history and sociology of the human and biomedical sciences. Situated within science and technology studies (STS), his doctoral thesis, titled 'Ordering Disorderly Personalities: The Co-Production of Antisocial Personality Disorder (ASPD) through Science, Law and Practice', presented a socio-historical analysis of ASPD from 1950 to 2007. In it, Martyn showed how - in spite of profound ontological uncertainty - ASPD became regarded as a treatable entity and object of governance. Theoretically, his work is situated in the sociologies of uncertainty and ‘enhancement’, and the co-productionist tradition of STS. Martyn also has active research interests in the intersections between STS and bioethics.

To date, Martyn’s research has focussed on the history and sociology of the human and biomedical sciences. Situated within science and technology studies (STS), his doctoral thesis, titled 'Ordering Disorderly Personalities: The Co-Production of Antisocial Personality Disorder (ASPD) through Science, Law and Practice', presented a socio-historical analysis of ASPD from 1950 to 2007. In it, Martyn showed how - in spite of profound ontological uncertainty - ASPD became regarded as a treatable entity and object of governance. Theoretically, his work is situated in the sociologies of uncertainty and ‘enhancement’, and the co-productionist tradition of STS. Martyn also has active research interests in the intersections between STS and bioethics.

Publications